Scopes

Scopes have been removed in PHP-DI 6. Read below for more explanations. From now on, all definitions are resolved once and their result is kept during the life of the container (i.e. what was called the singleton scope).

Scopes were used to make the container work as a factory: instead of using scopes you can either:

Below is an example of writing a factory object and injecting it.

Before:

return [
    Form::class => create()
        ->scope(Scope::PROTOTYPE), // a new form is created everytime it is injected
];

class Service
{
    public function __construct(Form $form)
    {
        $this->form = $form;
    }
}

After:

return [
    FormFactory::class => create(),
];

class Service
{
    public function __construct(FormFactory $formFactory)
    {
        $this->form = $formFactory->createForm();
    }
}

or:

class Service
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->form = new Form(/* parameters */);
    }
}

or you can also inject the container and use it explicitly as a factory (type-hint against DI\FactoryInterface to avoid being coupled to the container):

class Service
{
    public function __construct(\DI\FactoryInterface $factory)
    {
        $this->form = $factory->make(Form::class, /* parameters */);
    }
}

Scopes also created an illusion that some values could be recalculated on demand. For example you could imagine a factory that returns the current value of an environment variable:

return [
    'config' => factory(function () {
        return getenv('CONFIG_VAR');
    })->scope(Scope::PROTOTYPE),

    Service1::class => create()
        ->constructor(get('config')),
    Service2::class => create()
        ->constructor(get('config')),
];

Contrary to what one could think, if the CONFIG_VAR changes it will not be updated in places were it has already been injected before the change. Scopes are not a solution for values that can change during execution, yet they could be misinterpreted as such a solution.